The COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the challenges a multinational enterprise (“MNE”) faces when global supply chains are disrupted. Decisions must be made quickly when a distribution center is temporarily shut down, when employees in key supply chain roles cannot perform their functions in their expected locations and when the source of raw materials or components changes from one country to another.

The COVID-19 crisis has created a shock to the global supply chain system. This article, published in Thomson Reuters’ Journal of International Taxation, discusses some of the key international tax challenges associated with this disruption.

Read more on MayerBrown.com.

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If you wish to receive periodic updates on this or other topics related to the pandemic, you can be added to our COVID-19 “Special Interest” mailing list by subscribing here. For any other legal questions related to this pandemic, please contact the Firm’s COVID-19 Core Response Team at FW-SIG-COVID-19-Core-Response-Team@mayerbrown.com.

“In the Know,” Mayer Brown’s exclusive forum for professional women, hosted its annual speed-networking lunch on July 30.

In line with the times, guest speaker Shannon Block, a Denver, Colorado-based CEO and entrepreneur, offered an insightful discussion on “Digital Divides and Opportunities in the COVID-19 World.” Did you know that 70 percent of the US workforce does not have a four-year college degree? But that the majority of job roles—from network administrator to production supervisor and claims adjuster—require college experience as a basic requirement? Against this, the need to reskill the workforce—in particular, with digital literary skills—is a pressing one.

Over 20 clients joined Shannon and Hong Kong IP partner Gabriela Kennedy for the digital speed-networking event, hosted via Zoom. Guests discussed these big questions and shared how their own organizations are playing their part. The event was well-received, with one guest commenting, “There are no easy answers, but I’m glad someone is asking the questions.

We are all facing the challenges of transformation at the moment, and In the Know is pleased to be responding with creativity, adaptability and vision.

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If you wish to receive periodic updates on this or other topics related to the pandemic, you can be added to our COVID-19 “Special Interest” mailing list by subscribing here. For any other legal questions related to this pandemic, please contact the Firm’s COVID-19 Core Response Team at FW-SIG-COVID-19-Core-Response-Team@mayerbrown.com.

Mayer Brown partner Nicole Saharsky comments in the Bloomberg Law article “Zoom Courts Will Stick Around as Virus Forces Seismic Change,” which explores the future of virtual court proceedings post-pandemic.

“Ideally you want it to just be a conversation between you and the judge during oral arguments about your side of things and why your client is right, and it’s just easier to have a conversation like that in person.”
– Nicole Saharsky

Read the article in Bloomberg Law.

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If you wish to receive periodic updates on this or other topics related to the pandemic, you can be added to our COVID-19 “Special Interest” mailing list by subscribing here. For any other legal questions related to this pandemic, please contact the Firm’s COVID-19 Core Response Team at FW-SIG-COVID-19-Core-Response-Team@mayerbrown.com.

The Japanese government announced that it is banning entry in principle of foreigners who have visited Kenya, Venezuela and 15 other countries for the past 14 days prior to arriving in Japan.  In addition, all Japanese citizens (and any foreigners excluded from the entry ban) who have visited any of the countries subject to the entry ban will be subject to PCR testing upon arrival and will be asked to self-isolate for 14 days.  The Japanese government also announced that the entry restrictions currently in place have been extended through at least the end of August and may be extended further.

146 countries globally are now subject to Japan’s entry restriction measures.  The full list of additional countries subject to the entry restrictions include Botswana, the Comoros, Kenya, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Namibia, Nepal, Palestine, Paraguay, the Republic of the Congo, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan and Suriname.

Please refer to the following website (in English) for additional information.

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If you wish to receive periodic updates on this or other topics related to the pandemic, you can be added to our COVID-19 “Special Interest” mailing list by subscribing here. For any other legal questions related to this pandemic, please contact the Firm’s COVID-19 Core Response Team at FW-SIG-COVID-19-Core-Response-Team@mayerbrown.com.

US Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS), the agency within Homeland Security responsible for adjudicating applications and petitions seeking immigration and naturalization benefits, announced on Friday that staffing furloughs originally planned to begin August 3, have been delayed until August 31.  The delays, which could have affected some 70% of USCIS staff engaged in processing these benefits, stemmed from an allegedly “crippling budget shortfall” stemming from agency predictions of  a 61% drop in application and petition requests through the end of the fiscal year.

Members of Congress have questioned USCIS’s projections about its funding, including Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), who has said the agency projected it would end the fiscal year with a budget surplus.  A USCIS spokesperson also indicated that recent uptick in revenue has allowed the agency to postpone the furloughs.  Despite this, the agency is standing by its original request to Congress for an additional $1.2 billion in emergency funding, plus authorization to add a 10% surcharge on its application fees.

Our full coverage of the furlough issue may be found on The Mobile Workforce.

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If you wish to receive periodic updates on this or other topics related to the pandemic, you can be added to our COVID-19 “Special Interest” mailing list by subscribing here. For any other legal questions related to this pandemic, please contact the Firm’s COVID-19 Core Response Team at FW-SIG-COVID-19-Core-Response-Team@mayerbrown.com.

In this Blogpost, James Ferguson recaps on a recent webinar he participated in on “Arbitrating COVID-19 Contract Disputes” with his colleagues from London, Singapore, Frankfurt and Rio de Janeiro.  The discussion included the key issues likely to arise in arbitrations of COVID-19 contract disputes under both common law and civil law principles.  The speakers started by describing four examples of contractual disputes arising from the pandemic, they then used the four examples to identify 10 key issues that are likely to arise in arbitrating COVID-19 contract disputes under both civil law and common law principles.

Click here to read the full piece.

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If you wish to receive periodic updates on this or other topics related to the pandemic, you can be added to our COVID-19 “Special Interest” mailing list by subscribing here. For any other legal questions related to this pandemic, please contact the Firm’s COVID-19 Core Response Team at FW-SIG-COVID-19-Core-Response-Team@mayerbrown.com.

On 25 June 2020, the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Bill (the “Bill”) received Royal Assent and on 26 June 2020 CIGA came into force. The restructuring team in Mayer Brown’s London office have previously commented on the different elements of the Bill in a series of blog posts and podcasts. CIGA was swiftly followed by the introduction of The Pension Protection Fund (Moratorium and Arrangements and Reconstruction for Companies in Financial Difficulty) Regulations 2020 (the “Regulations“), which came into force on 7 July and were subsequently amended yesterday on 23 July. Now that CIGA is in force, we take a closer look at the legislation from a pensions perspective.

Continue Reading The UK Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2020 (“CIGA”) from a Pensions Perspective

Today, the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts announced that the federal government has agreed to rescind, on a nationwide basis, a policy that could have required hundreds of thousands of immigrant students studying at U.S. institutions to leave the country and likely curtail their studies. In the litigation challenging this policy, Mayer Brown represented and filed an amici curiae brief on behalf of 19 businesses and business associations that collectively power the U.S. economy.

Continue Reading Trump Administration Abandons Plan That Would Have Required International Students Taking Fully Online Courses to Leave the Country

The establishment of the COVID-19 virus as a global pandemic halted international movement for travelers around the globe since March. Countries across regions enforced varying levels of restrictions on incoming travelers, particularly for non-essential travel, as host governments attempted to restrict additional sources of infection through extraordinary means. Now, an increasing number of countries and regions are working together to bridge the once necessary divide by developing networks of “air bridges” and “travel bubbles” to allow cross-border travel where the virus appears to be under control. “Air bridges,” “air corridors,” “travel bubbles,” or “travel corridors” are reciprocal agreements between any number of countries that allow for non-essential travel, generally without requiring a self-isolated quarantining period upon arrival and return.

Continue Reading Air Bridges and Travel Corridors: Regional Travel Agreements in the Face of COVID-19

The Japanese government will look to begin discussions around mid-July to resume flights for certain qualified business purposes to China, Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei, Cambodia, Myanmar, Laos and Mongolia.  Further details on the Japanese government’s plans for negotiations are expected to be announced soon.  As discussed in our prior blog post, this is in addition to similar discussions that have already began with Vietnam, Thailand, Australia and New Zealand.  In late June, Vietnam allowed entry of approximately 450 business travellers from Japan into the country (subject to PCR testing upon arrival and a 14-day hotel quarantine).

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If you wish to receive periodic updates on this or other topics related to the pandemic, you can be added to our COVID-19 “Special Interest” mailing list by subscribing here. For any other legal questions related to this pandemic, please contact the Firm’s COVID-19 Core Response Team at FW-SIG-COVID-19-Core-Response-Team@mayerbrown.com.